Mary Anderson1

F, #99467, b. 19 December 1773, d. 6 September 1840
  • Birth*: 19 December 1773; Pownal, Bennngton Co., Vermont, U.S.A.; Date Dec 19 1773 & location Pownal, Bennington Co., Bermont per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 15 2019. per Loyalist List - Capt. Samuel Anderson of Cornwall.1,2
  • Marriage*: 5 January 1798; Cornwall Twp., Stormont Co., Upper Canada; Date Jan 5 1798 & location Cornwall per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 15 2019. per Loyalist List - Capt. Samuel Anderson of Cornwall.; Principal=Col. John Donovan1,2
  • Death*: 6 September 1840; Cornwall, Stormont Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 15 2019.2
  • Residence*: 5 January 1798; Cornwall, Upper Canada; O.C. Date - per Loyalist List - Capt. Samuel Anderson of Cornwall.1
  • Married Name: 5 January 1798; Donovan1

Family: Col. John Donovan b. 1772

Citations

  1. [S29] Loyalist Lists.
  2. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Col. John Donovan1,2,3

M, #99468, b. 1772
  • Birth*: 1772; Ireland; Date 1772 & location Ireland per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 15 2019. per Loyalist List - Capt. Samuel Anderson of Cornwall.2,3
  • Marriage*: 5 January 1798; Cornwall Twp., Stormont Co., Upper Canada; Date Jan 5 1798 & location Cornwall per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 15 2019. per Loyalist List - Capt. Samuel Anderson of Cornwall.; Principal=Mary Anderson2,3

Family: Mary Anderson b. 19 Dec 1773, d. 6 Sep 1840

Citations

  1. Col. John Donovan per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 15 2019.
  2. [S29] Loyalist Lists.
  3. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Cyrus Anderson1

M, #99469, b. July 1769
  • Birth*: July 1769; Pownal, Bennington Co., Vermont, U.S.A.; Date Jul 1769 & location Pownal, Bennington Co., Vermont per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 15 2019. per Loyalist List - Capt. Samuel Anderson of Cornwall.1,2
  • Residence*: 22 July 1797; Cornwall, Upper Canada; O.C. Date - per Loyalist List - Capt. Samuel Anderson of Cornwall.1

Citations

  1. [S29] Loyalist Lists.
  2. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

James Anderson1

M, #99470, b. 18 September 1771
  • Birth*: 18 September 1771; Pownal, Bennington Co., Vermont, U.S.A.; Date Sep 18 1771 & location Pownal, Bennington Co., Vermont per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 15 2019. Date 1781 per Loyalist List - Capt. Samuel Anderson of Cornwall.1,2
  • Marriage*: circa 1820; Cornwall Twp., Stormont Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 15 2019.; Principal=Dorothy Mnu2
  • Residence*: 29 July 1797; Cornwall, Upper Canada; O. C. Date - per Loyalist List - Capt. Samuel Anderson of Cornwall.1

Family: Dorothy Mnu b. 1783, d. b 1891

Citations

  1. [S29] Loyalist Lists.
  2. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Lieut. Joseph Anderson1,2,3

M, #99471, b. 25 November 1762, d. 19 July 1853
  • Birth*: 25 November 1762; Pownal, Bennington Co., Vermont, U.S.A.; Date 1761 & location US per 1851 Census. "U.E." per Loyalist List - Capt. Samuel Anderson of Cornwall. Date Nov 25 1762 & location Pownal, Bennington, Vermont per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.2,3,4
  • Marriage*: circa 1784; Montreal, Quebec; per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.; Principal=Hannah "Johanna" Farrand3
  • Death*: 19 July 1853; Cornwall, Stormont Co., Canada West; Date Jul 19 1853 & location Cornwall per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 15 2019.3
  • Note*: January 1804; Cornwall, Upper Canada; "In the winter of 1803-04, Robert I. D. Gray went to Albany. On his return he wrote a letter to his cousin, Mrs. Catherine Valentine, dated at Kingston. February 16. 1804, of which the following is an extract: "I saw some of our old friends while in the States. None was I more happy to meet than Lavine, Dorine's mother. Just as I was leaving Albany I heard from our cousin, Mrs. Garret Staats, who is living in Albany, that Lavine was living in a tavern with a man of the name of Bramley. I immediately employed a friend of mine (Mr. Ramsay, of Albany,) to negotiate with the man for the purchase of her. He did so, stating that I wished to buy her freedom, in consequence of which the man readily complied with my wishes, and although he declared she was worth to him, £100.0.0, he gave her to me for $50.00. When I saw her she was overjoyed, and appeared as happy as any person could be at the idea of seeing her child Dorine and her children once more, with whom, if Dorine wishes it, she will willingly spend the remainder of her days. I could not avoid doing this act; the opportunity seemed to have been thrown in my way by Providence, and I could not resist. She is a good servant yet, healthy and strong, and among you you may find her useful. I have promised her that she may work as much or as little as she pleases, while she lives ; but from the character I have of her, idleness is not her pleasure." Mr. Gray adds: "I saw old Cato, Lavine's father, at Newark, while I was at Colonel Ogden's. He is living with Mrs. Governeur, is well taken care of, and blind: poor fellow came to feel me, for he could not see. He asked affectionately after the family." Lavine came to Canada and lived for the remainder of her life in the family of Judge Anderson, near Cornwall." (Lunenburgh, or the Old Eastern District, page 319 & 320, Chapter XXXVI - John Baker, the last of those who were born in slavery in Canada.)
  • Note: 8 October 1804; Lake Ontario, Newcastle, Newcastle Dist., Upper Canada; Lieut. Joseph Anderson's brother, John Anderson, was a promising young law student who accompanied Solicitor-General Robert I. D. Gray on the Speedy in October 1804 as was lost along with his boss when the ship sank in a storm. The double connection here is that Simon Baker, who was Robert I.. D. Gray's body servant, was also on the Speedy. His grandmother had just a few months before been purchased in Albany by Mr. Gray and lived in Lieut. Joseph Anderson's household near Cornwall.
  • Census*: 1851; Cornwall Twp., Stormont Co., Canada West; Age 90 at 1851 Census: Anderson, Joseph, 90, b. US, CE, farmer, ?; Clews, Samuel J., 22, b. UC, CE, married?; Mary E., 16, b. US; Johannah, 18, b. US; Delia E., 52. b. UC, CE, W? ; Johnson, Joseph, 18, b. UC, CE; Welsh, Sarah H. C. C., 18, b. UC, CE (1851 Census: Cornwall Twp., Stormont Co., pg. 17 of 262, line 11 - ancestry.ca)4

Family: Hannah "Johanna" Farrand b. Jun 1759, d. 1850

Citations

  1. Lieut. Joseph Anderson per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.
  2. [S29] Loyalist Lists.
  3. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.
  4. [S11] Unknown author, 1851 Canada Census, Record Type: microfilm.

Ebenezer Anderson1

M, #99472, b. 4 April 1764
  • Birth*: 4 April 1764; Pownal, Bennington Co., Vermont, U.S.A.; Date Apr 4 1764 & location Pownal, Bennington Co., Vermont per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 15 2019. per Loyalist List - Capt. Samuel Anderson of Cornwall.1,2

Citations

  1. [S29] Loyalist Lists.
  2. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Elisha Anderson1

M, #99473, b. March 1766, d. 15 May 1818
  • Birth*: March 1766; Pownal, Bennington Co., Vermont, U.S.A.; Date Mar 1766 & location Pownal, Bennington Co., Vermont per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 15 2019. per Loyalist List - Capt. Samuel Anderson of Cornwall.1,2
  • Death*: 15 May 1818; Cornwall Twp., Stormont Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 15 2019.2

Citations

  1. [S29] Loyalist Lists.
  2. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

George Anderson1

M, #99474, b. circa 1786
  • Birth*: circa 1786; Cornwall, Quebec; per Loyalist List - Capt. Samuel Anderson of Cornwall.1

Citations

  1. [S29] Loyalist Lists.

Hannah "Johanna" Farrand1

F, #99475, b. June 1759, d. 1850
  • Birth*: June 1759; New Jersey, U.S.A.; per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.1
  • Marriage*: circa 1784; Montreal, Quebec; per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.; Principal=Lieut. Joseph Anderson1
  • Death*: 1850; Cornwall, Stormont Co., Canada West; Date 1850 & location Cornwall per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.1
  • Married Name: circa 1784; Anderson1

Family: Lieut. Joseph Anderson b. 25 Nov 1762, d. 19 Jul 1853

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Daniel Farrand1

M, #99476, b. 1726, d. 7 March 1764
  • Birth*: 1726; Newark, Essex Co., New Jersey, U.S.A.; Date 1726 & location Newark, Essex Co., New Jersey per family tree of Vicky Kramer on ancestry.ca, Oct 14 2020. per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.1
  • Marriage*: 1752; New York, U.S.A.; Date 1752 & location New York State per family tree of Vicky Kramer on ancestry.ca, Oct 14 2020. per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.; Principal=Margaret Low1
  • Death*: 7 March 1764; Newark, Essex Co., New Jersey, U.S.A.; Date Mar 7 1764 per FindaGrave and family tree of Vicky Kramer on ancestry.ca, Oct 14 2020. per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.1,2
  • Burial*: 9 March 1764; Fairmont Cemetery, Newark, Essex Co., New Jersey, U.S.A.; FindaGrave: Name: Daniel Farrand; BIRTH: unknown; DEATH: 7 Mar 1764; BURIAL: Fairmount Cemetery, Newark, Essex County, New Jersey, USA; PLOT: Old Burying Ground relocated to Fairmount Cemetery; MEMORIAL ID: 12944249; Note: Gravesite Details Died age 38 years. Reinterred at Fairmount Cemetery, Newark in a mass grave. (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/12944249/daniel-farrand)2

Family: Margaret Low b. 15 Sep 1734, d. 3 Nov 1798

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.
  2. [S128] FindAGrave, online unknown url.
  3. [S83] Ancestry.ca, online unknown url.

Margaret Low1

F, #99477, b. 15 September 1734, d. 3 November 1798
  • Birth*: 15 September 1734; Belleville, Essex Co., New Jersey, U.S.A.; Date Sep 15 1734 & location Belleville, Essex Co., NJ per family tree of Vicky Kramer on ancestry.ca, Oct 14 2020. per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.1
  • Marriage*: 1752; New York, U.S.A.; Date 1752 & location New York State per family tree of Vicky Kramer on ancestry.ca, Oct 14 2020. per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.; Principal=Daniel Farrand1
  • Death*: 3 November 1798; Monmouth, New Jersey, U.S.A.; Date Nov 3 1798 & location Monmouth, NJ per family tree of Vicky Kramer on ancestry.ca, Oct 14 2020.1
  • Married Name: 1752; Farrand1

Family: Daniel Farrand b. 1726, d. 7 Mar 1764

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.
  2. [S83] Ancestry.ca, online unknown url.

Robert Isaac Dey Gray Anderson1

M, #99478, b. 1792, d. 16 April 1874
  • Birth*: 1792; Cornwall, Stormont Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.1
  • Marriage*: 12 July 1866; Toronto, York Co., Canada West; per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.; Principal=Julia Cooch1
  • Death*: 16 April 1874; Toronto, York Co., Ontario; per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.1

Family: Julia Cooch b. 1819, d. 8 Dec 1893

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Julia Cooch1

F, #99479, b. 1819, d. 8 December 1893
  • Birth*: 1819; England; per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.1
  • Marriage*: 12 July 1866; Toronto, York Co., Canada West; per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.; Principal=Robert Isaac Dey Gray Anderson1
  • Death*: 8 December 1893; Toronto, York Co., Ontario; per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.1
  • Married Name: 12 July 1866; Anderson1

Family: Robert Isaac Dey Gray Anderson b. 1792, d. 16 Apr 1874

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Lieut. James Pringle1

M, #99480, b. 16 February 1784, d. 13 October 1860
  • Birth*: 16 February 1784; Edinburgh, Scotland; per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.1
  • Marriage*: 3 October 1815; Cornwall, Stormont Co., Upper Canada; Date Oct 3 1815 & location Cornwall per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Aug 15 2019. per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.; Principal=Ann Margaret Anderson1
  • Death*: 13 October 1860; Cornwall, Stormont Co., Canada West; per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.1

Family: Ann Margaret Anderson b. 19 Apr 1796, d. 26 Aug 1870

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Ann Margaret Anderson1

F, #99481, b. 19 April 1796, d. 26 August 1870
  • Birth*: 19 April 1796; Cornwall, Stormont Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.1
  • Marriage*: 3 October 1815; Cornwall, Stormont Co., Upper Canada; Date Oct 3 1815 & location Cornwall per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Aug 15 2019. per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.; Principal=Lieut. James Pringle1
  • Death*: 26 August 1870; Cornwall, Stormont Co., Ontario; per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.1
  • Married Name: 3 October 1815; Pringle1

Family: Lieut. James Pringle b. 16 Feb 1784, d. 13 Oct 1860

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Johannes "John" Low1

M, #99482, b. 9 September 1702, d. 27 September 1774
  • Birth*: 9 September 1702; New York, King's Co., New York, U.S.A.; per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.1
  • Marriage*: circa 1723; U.S.A.; per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.; Principal=Sarah Provoost1
  • Death*: 27 September 1774; New York, King's Co., New York, U.S.A.; per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.1
  • Note*: 1759; New York, U.S.A.; "A well-known character in Cornwall twenty years ago was John Baker, who died in January, 1871. He was a mulatto, and had been a slave, as had been also his mother, Dorine, his grandmother, Lavine, and his great-grandfather, Cato. The history of his family goes back to a period prior to the settlement of Upper Canada, in fact to the time in the old Colony days when the war with France was a thing of the future and the Revolutionary war not dreamed of.
    Cato, John's great-grandfather, was an African. He was brought to North America, where he became the slave of Mr. John Low, a resident of Newark, New Jersey. While in Mr. Low's service, Cato's daughter named Lavine was born, who in 1759 gave birth to Dorine, John Baker's mother. The date of Dorine's birth is established, from the following facts: Mr. Low's daughter Margaret married Dr. Farrand (a physician living in the State of New York) in 1752 or 1753. In 1759 Mrs. Farrand gave birth to a daughter named Hannah, who afterwards married Joseph Anderson, a lieutenant in the King's Royal Regiment of New York. It was a well-known tradition in the Farrand family that Hannah Farrand and the daughter of the slave Lavine were born in the same year." (Lunenburgh, or the Old Eastern District, page 318, Chapter XXXVI - John Baker, the last of those who were born in slavery in Canada.)

Family: Sarah Provoost b. 15 Apr 1705, d. 27 Sep 1774

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Sarah Provoost1

F, #99483, b. 15 April 1705, d. 27 September 1774
  • Birth*: 15 April 1705; Kingston, Ulster Co., New York, U.S.A.; per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.1
  • Marriage*: circa 1723; U.S.A.; per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.; Principal=Johannes "John" Low1
  • Death*: 27 September 1774; Kingston, Ulster Co., New York, U.S.A.; per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.1
  • Married Name: circa 1723; Low1

Family: Johannes "John" Low b. 9 Sep 1702, d. 27 Sep 1774

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Elizabeth Low1

F, #99484, b. 26 September 1736, d. 14 February 1800
  • Birth*: 26 September 1736; per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.1
  • Marriage*: 1763; New York, U.S.A.; "In 1763 Elizabeth Low, another daughter of John Low, married James Gray, who had been a captain in the 42nd Regiment (the Black Watch), and had sold out after the taking of Havana, in the Island of Cuba, in 1762. Whether Lavine and her daughter Dorine, or Dorine alone, was given to Mrs. Gray by her father, is not distinctly known, but it was known that Dorine was the property of the Grays, and that when the breaking up of families began in 1776, Captain Gray and his wife, and their nephew and nieces, Jacob Farrand and Hannah and Catherine Farrand (children of Dr. and Mrs. Margaret Farrand), came to Canada, and brought with them Dorine, then in her seventeenth year.
    (Lunenburgh, or the Old Eastern District, page 318 & 319, Chapter XXXVI - John Baker, the last of those who were born in slavery in Canada.) per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.; Principal=Captain James Gray1
  • Death*: 14 February 1800; Gray's Creek, Stormont Co., Upper Canada; Date FEb 14 1800 per Memorial.
  • Burial*: 16 February 1800; English Church Cemetery, Cornwall, Stormont Co., Upper Canada; "In the Cornwall graveyard, connected with the English Church, is the family tomb of the Grays and their connections. This is " piece of land about 20 feet square, surrounded by a stone fence. On a wooden slab, erected against this on the outside, the following inscription was visible in and may no doubt,
    still be seen: "Herein are interred Colonel James Gray, died 11th May, 1795, aged 64; Mrs. Elizabeth Gray, died 14th February, 1800; aged 63; Jacob Farrand, Esq., died 11th May, 1803, aged 29 years and 6 months; And John T. Farrand, Esq., died 29th June, 1814, aged 30 years and 1 months; This memorial is erected by Cath. Valentine."" Osgoode Hall Reminiscences, pg. 132
  • Married Name: 1763; Gray1

Family: Captain James Gray b. 1731, d. 11 May 1795

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Captain James Gray1

M, #99485, b. 1731, d. 11 May 1795
  • Birth*: 1731; Scotland; Date 1731 per Memorial - age 64 at death May 11 1795. Date c. 1725 & location Scotland per family tree of Grc08 on ancestry.ca, Jan 14 2019. per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.1
  • Marriage*: 1763; New York, U.S.A.; "In 1763 Elizabeth Low, another daughter of John Low, married James Gray, who had been a captain in the 42nd Regiment (the Black Watch), and had sold out after the taking of Havana, in the Island of Cuba, in 1762. Whether Lavine and her daughter Dorine, or Dorine alone, was given to Mrs. Gray by her father, is not distinctly known, but it was known that Dorine was the property of the Grays, and that when the breaking up of families began in 1776, Captain Gray and his wife, and their nephew and nieces, Jacob Farrand and Hannah and Catherine Farrand (children of Dr. and Mrs. Margaret Farrand), came to Canada, and brought with them Dorine, then in her seventeenth year.
    (Lunenburgh, or the Old Eastern District, page 318 & 319, Chapter XXXVI - John Baker, the last of those who were born in slavery in Canada.) per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.; Principal=Elizabeth Low1
  • Death*: 11 May 1795; Gray's Creek, Stormont Co., Upper Canada; "On leaving New York, the Grays had taken their three slaves with them. These slaves, Dorinda Baker and her two sons, Simon and John, became the property of Robert on the death of his father." Speedy Justice, pg. 85 Date May 11 1795 & location Stormont Co. per family tree of Grc08 on ancestry.ca, Jan 14 2019.2,1
  • Burial*: 13 May 1795; English Church Cemetery, Cornwall, Stormont Co., Upper Canada; "In the Cornwall graveyard, connected with the English Church, is the family tomb of the Grays and their connections. This is " piece of land about 20 feet square, surrounded by a stone fence. On a wooden slab, erected against this on the outside, the following inscription was visible in and may no doubt,
    still be seen: "Herein are interred Colonel James Gray, died 11th May, 1795, aged 64; Mrs. Elizabeth Gray, died 14th February, 1800; aged 63; Jacob Farrand, Esq., died 11th May, 1803, aged 29 years and 6 months; And John T. Farrand, Esq., died 29th June, 1814, aged 30 years and 1 months; This memorial is erected by Cath. Valentine."" Osgoode Hall Reminiscences, pg. 132
  • Note: 1762; New York, U.S.A.; His father, James Gray, a Highlander, was a captain in the "Black Watch," the 42nd Regiment, and retiring after the British took Havana in 1762, he lived for a time in New York State, ... " Osgoode Hall: Reminiscences page 130
  • Residence: 1776; Quebec; " ... and that when the breaking up of families began in 1776, Captain Gray and his wife, and their nephew and nieces, Jacob Farrand and Hannah and Catherine Farrand (children of Dr. and Mrs. Margaret Farrand), came to Canada, and brought with them Dorine, then in her seventeenth year." (Lunenburgh, or the Old Eastern District, page 318 & 319, Chapter XXXVI - John Baker, the last of those who were born in slavery in Canada.)
  • Note*: 1776; Quebec; "At the outbreak of the American revolution the Gray family fled to the province of Quebec where James Gray was appointed major in the 1st battalion of Sir John Johnson*’s King’s Royal Regiment of New York." from Dictionary of Canadian Biography - Robert Isaac Dey Grray - http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio/gray_robert_isaac_dey_5E.html3
  • Note: 1783; Gray's Creek, Stormont Co., Quebec; "On leaving New York, the Grays had taken their three slaves with them. These slaves, Dorinda Baker and her two sons, Simon and John, became the property of Robert on the death of his father. Robert Gray was a benevolent slaveowner, as demonstrated by the following event a few months before the sinking of the Speedy. While on a visit to New York Gray wrote to his sister:
    I saw some of our old friends while in the States, none was I more happy to meet than Lavine, Dorin's mother. Just as I was leaving Albany I heard from our cousin, Mrs. Garret Stadts, who is living in Albany in obscurity and indigence owing to her husband being a drunken idle fellow, that Lavine was living in a tavern with a man of the name of Broomly. I immediately employed a friend of mine, Mr. Ramsay, of Albany, to negotiate with the man for the purchase of her. He did so by stating that I wished to buy her freedom, in consequence of which the man readily complied with my wishes, and although he declared she was worth to him 100 pounds (ie $250) he gave her to me for $50 dollars. When I saw her she was overjoyed and appeared as happy as any person could be, at the idea of seeing her child Dorin, and her children once more, with whom if Dorin wishes it, she will willingly spend the remainder of her days. I could not avoid doing this act, the opportunity seemed to have been thrown in my way by Providence, and I could not resist it. She is a good servant yet, healthy and strong and among you you may find her useful. I have promised her that she may work as much or as little as she pleases while she lives - but from the character I have of her idleness is not her pleasure ... I saw old Cato, La vine's father at Newark while I was at Colonel Ogden's; he is living with Mrs. Governeur - he is well taken care of and blind - poor fellow came to feel me for he could not see, he asked affectionately after the family.'" Speedy Justice, pg. 84 & 852
  • Residence*: 1783; Gray's Creek, Glengarry Co., Quebec; 'At the end of the war Gray received land and took up residence just east of the loyalist settlement of New Johnstown (Cornwall, Ont.)." http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio/gray_robert_isaac_dey_5E.html3
  • Residence: 14 October 1784; Williamsburgh Twp., Lunenburg Dist., Quebec; "Return of Disbanded Troops and Loyalists settled in Township No. 4 (Williamsburgh) Mustered this 14th October 1784; Index: (Top line) B461; Name: Major Gray; Men: 1; Total: 1; Remarks: In Canada" per family tree of Grc08 on ancestry.ca, Jan 14 2019.
    Note: Quit likely that the family was still in Quebec in late 1784 and they would come down to Gray's Creek in the next year.1
  • Note: circa 1788; Gray's Creek, Stormont Co., Quebec; "Young Gray benefited from the prominence of his father, who had been appointed lieutenant of the county of Stormont by Lieutenant Governor SIMCOE." http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio/gray_robert_isaac_dey_5E.html3

Family: Elizabeth Low b. 26 Sep 1736, d. 14 Feb 1800

  • Marriage*: 1763; New York, U.S.A.; "In 1763 Elizabeth Low, another daughter of John Low, married James Gray, who had been a captain in the 42nd Regiment (the Black Watch), and had sold out after the taking of Havana, in the Island of Cuba, in 1762. Whether Lavine and her daughter Dorine, or Dorine alone, was given to Mrs. Gray by her father, is not distinctly known, but it was known that Dorine was the property of the Grays, and that when the breaking up of families began in 1776, Captain Gray and his wife, and their nephew and nieces, Jacob Farrand and Hannah and Catherine Farrand (children of Dr. and Mrs. Margaret Farrand), came to Canada, and brought with them Dorine, then in her seventeenth year.
    (Lunenburgh, or the Old Eastern District, page 318 & 319, Chapter XXXVI - John Baker, the last of those who were born in slavery in Canada.) per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.; Principal=Elizabeth Low1

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.
  2. [S157] Brendan O'Brien, Speedy Justice.
  3. [S129] Dictionary Cdn BIOs, online unknown url.

Robert Isaac Dey Gray1

M, #99486, b. 1772, d. 8 October 1804
  • Birth*: 1772; Albany Co., New York, U.S.A.; Date 1772 & location Albany Co., NY per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019. "GRAY (Grey), ROBERT ISAAC DEY, office holder, lawyer, judge, and politician; b. c. 1772, probably in New York, son of James Gray and Elizabeth Low; d. unmarried 7 or 8 Oct. 1804 in the wreck of the Speedy on Lake
    Ontario." per Dictionary of Canadian Biogrphy, Robert Isaac Dey Gray (Grey) - http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio/gray_robert_isaac_dey_5E.html1,2
  • Death*: 8 October 1804; Lake Ontario, Newcastle, Newcastle Dist., Upper Canada; Date Oct 7 1804 & location Presqu'ile, UC per family tree of reidml47 on ancestry.ca, Jan 12 2019.1
  • Residence: 1776; Quebec; " ... and that when the breaking up of families began in 1776, Captain Gray and his wife, and their nephew and nieces, Jacob Farrand and Hannah and Catherine Farrand (children of Dr. and Mrs. Margaret Farrand), came to Canada, and brought with them Dorine, then in her seventeenth year." (Lunenburgh, or the Old Eastern District, page 318 & 319, Chapter XXXVI - John Baker, the last of those who were born in slavery in Canada.)
  • Residence*: 1783; Gray's Creek, Glengarry Co., Quebec; "At the outbreak of the American revolution the Gray family fled to the province of Quebec where James Gray was appointed major in the 1st battalion of Sir John Johnson*’s King’s Royal Regiment of New York. At the end of the war Gray received land and took up residence just east of the loyalist settlement of New Johnstown (Cornwall, Ont.). Robert Isaac Dey Gray received his early education and acquired an interest in law at Quebec, probably under the tutelage of his godfather Isaac Ogden." http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio/gray_robert_isaac_dey_5E.html2
  • Note: 1786; House of Assembly, Stormont Co., Upper Canada; "It was usual in Upper Canada for both the solicitor and the attorney general to hold seats in the House of Assembly and act as administration spokesmen. Gray was no exception. He was elected for the riding of Stormont in the election of 1796 and to the new riding of Stormont and Russell in 1800 and 1804." http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio/gray_robert_isaac_dey_5E.html2
  • Residence: 5 September 1793; Eastern Dist., Upper Canada; "Young Gray benefited from the prominence of his father, who had been appointed lieutenant of the county of Stormont by Lieutenant Governor SIMCOE. On 5 Sept. 1793 Gray became surrogate court registrar for the Eastern District, .." http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio/gray_robert_isaac_dey_5E.html2
  • Note*: May 1795; "The following month Simcoe recommended him for the vacant office of solicitor general “not only on his Father’s merits” but to enable him to further his education in England “and by these means acquire the habits and character of the English Bar.” The Duke of Portland, the Home secretary, approved Simcoe’s choice in May 1795 but wondered whether “the present state of the Province required both an Attorney and Solicitor General.”
  • Residence: 7 June 1796; Home Dist., Upper Canada; " ... serving until his appointment as district court judge for the Home District on 7 June 1796. Along with 15 others he was called to the bar in October 1794 by an act of the legislature." http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio/gray_robert_isaac_dey_5E.html2
  • Residence: 21 March 1797; North Side of Wellington St., York, York Co., Upper Canada; "He became Solicitor-General March 21, 1797, and lived then on the north side of Wellington Street, Toronto. In his family Mr. Gray had a coloured slave woman, Dorinda Baker, and her children, among whom were John and Simon." Osgood Hall: Reminiscense, pg 130
  • Note: 1798; House of Assembly, Stormont Co., Upper Canada; "Although a slave-holder himself, in 1798 he was among the minority that opposed Christopher Robinson*’s bill extending slavery within the province." http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio/gray_robert_isaac_dey_5E.html2
  • Note: 1798; Conc 2 Lot 11, Whitby Twp., York Co., Upper Canada; "It may be a matter of surprise and of some historic interest to know that at least 200 acres of this land, the N. W. Ward, was once the property of an actual slave. It will be observed that the Crown granted this farm in 1798 to Elizabeth Gray, the mother of R. S. D. Gray, Attorney General of Upper Canada, who was drowned on the ill-fated boat " Speedy" about 1804. A copy of his will, dated 1803, reads as follows: ''I feel it a duty incumbent on me, in consequence of the long and faithful services of Dorinda, my black woman servant, rendered to my family, to release, manumit and discharge her from the state of slavery in which she now is, and to give her and all her children their freedom. My will therefore is that she be released, and I hereby accordingly release, manumit and discharge the said Dorinda, my black woman servant, and all and every one of her said children, both male and female, from slavery, and declare them and every one of them to be free. And in order that provision may be made for the support of the said Dorinda and her children, and that she may not want after my decease, my will is, and I hereby empower my executors out of my real estate to raise the sum of twelve hundred pounds currency, and place the same in some solvent and secure fund, and the interest accruing from the same, I give and bequeath to the said Dorinda, her heirs and assigns forever, to be paid annually." Historical Sketches of Oshawa by Kaiser, Page 30
    List of Land pg. 32 "Lot No. 11, 2nd Concession, E. Whitby (Now Ward No. 3, N. Ward); Date: 1798; Grantor: The Crown; Grantee: Elizabeth Gray; mother of R. S. D. Gray, drowned on Speedy; Acres: 200 (Historical Sketches of Oshawa by Kaiser, Page 32)
  • Residence: 1798; Upper Canada; "Gray became a barrister in Trinity term 1797 and served as treasurer of the Law Society of Upper Canada from 1798 to 1801." http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio/gray_robert_isaac_dey_5E.html2
  • Note: 1799; House of Assembly, Stormont Co., Upper Canada; "The following year he voted with the majority defeating a bill to allow Methodists the right to solemnize marriage." http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio/gray_robert_isaac_dey_5E.html2
  • Note: 1800; Acting Attorney General, York, York Co., Upper Canada; "When Attorney General John White* was killed in 1800, Gray temporarily assumed the duties of that office until the arrival of Thomas Scott* in 1801." http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio/gray_robert_isaac_dey_5E.html2
  • Note: 1800; House of Assembly, Stormont Co., Upper Canada; "It was usual in Upper Canada for both the solicitor and the attorney general to hold seats in the House of Assembly and act as administration spokesmen. Gray was no exception. He was elected for the riding of Stormont in the election of 1796 and to the new riding of Stormont and Russell in 1800 and 1804." http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio/gray_robert_isaac_dey_5E.html2
  • Note: 1801; Solicitor General, York, York Co., Upper Canada; "As solicitor general Gray often represented the crown in criminal cases across the province." http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio/gray_robert_isaac_dey_5E.html
    Note: Does not say when he was appointed Solicitor General, but assuming it was after being Acting Attorney General in 1801.2
  • Note: circa 1803; ""Young Gray was," John Baker said, "the only child of the Colonel, and went to Parliament several years running. The Colonel was strict and sharp, put deerskin shirts and jackets on me and gave me many good whippings. Simon was older than me and was Solisarv (sic) Gray's body-servant. I lived two years in Toronto, or little York, in a large white house north of the boat landing. The people were proud and grand then. Simon was dressed finer than his master, with a beaver hat and gold watch." Osgoode Reminiscences, pg. 131, the speaker is John Baker, in 1868, the brother of Simon Baker, Robert Gray's servant who perished with him on the Speedy.
  • Note: 1803; House of Assembly, Stormont Co., Upper Canada; "In 1800 he was among the eastern members who opposed Samuel STREET’s election as speaker and the next year cast his vote against Surveyor General David William Smith*’s election to the speakership. Gray led the resistance to Macdonell’s contempt proceedings in 1803 against the clerk of the crown and pleas, David Burns, yet during the same session he supported Macdonell’s Assessment Bill." http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio/gray_robert_isaac_dey_5E.html2
  • Note: 27 August 1803; York, York Co., Upper Canada; "By his will, made August 27th, 1803, the Solicitor-General manumits his "faithful black servant Dorinda," and gives her and her children their freedom. He left to John and Simon each two hundred acres of land and made provision for the maintenance of the family." Osgoode Hall: Reminiscense, pg. 130
  • Note: circa 1804; York, York Co., Upper Canada; "He regularly served as the assembly’s liaison with the Legislative Council and consistently resisted the assembly’s attempts to curtail or limit the prerogatives of the lieutenant governor. He initiated several pieces of legislation usually concerning the reform of law and its administration and took a particular interest in the regulation of inland trade and designation of ports of entry [see Colin MCNABB]." http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio/gray_robert_isaac_dey_5E.html2
  • Note: 1804; House of Assembly, Stormont Co., Upper Canada; "It was usual in Upper Canada for both the solicitor and the attorney general to hold seats in the House of Assembly and act as administration spokesmen. Gray was no exception. He was elected for the riding of Stormont in the election of 1796 and to the new riding of Stormont and Russell in 1800 and 1804." http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio/gray_robert_isaac_dey_5E.html2
  • Note: 1804; House of Assembly, Stormont Co., Upper Canada; "In 1804 he favoured the passage of the notorious Sedition Bill [see Robert Fleming Gourlay*]." http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio/gray_robert_isaac_dey_5E.html2
  • Note: January 1804; Albany, New York, U.S.A.; "In the winter of 1803-04, Robert I. D. Gray went to Albany. On his return he wrote a letter to his cousin, Mrs. Catherine Valentine, dated at Kingston. February 16. 1804, of which the following is an extract: "I saw some of our old friends while in the States. None was I more happy to meet than Lavine, Dorine's mother. Just as I was leaving Albany I heard from our cousin, Mrs. Garret Staats, who is living in Albany, that Lavine was living in a tavern with a man of the name of Bramley. I immediately employed a friend of mine (Mr. Ramsay, of Albany,) to negotiate with the man for the purchase of her. He did so, stating that I wished to buy her freedom, in consequence of which the man readily complied with my wishes, and although he declared she was worth to him, £100.0.0, he gave her to me for $50.00. When I saw her she was overjoyed, and appeared as happy as any person could be at the idea of seeing her child Dorine and her children once more, with whom, if Dorine wishes it, she will willingly spend the remainder of her days. I could not avoid doing this act; the opportunity seemed to have been thrown in my way by Providence, and I could not resist. She is a good servant yet, healthy and strong, and among you you may find her useful. I have promised her that she may work as much or as little as she pleases, while she lives ; but from the character I have of her, idleness is not her pleasure." Mr. Gray adds: "I saw old Cato, Lavine's father, at Newark, while I was at Colonel Ogden's. He is living with Mrs. Governeur, is well taken care of, and blind: poor fellow came to feel me, for he could not see. He asked affectionately after the family." Lavine came to Canada and lived for the remainder of her life in the family of Judge Anderson, near Cornwall." (Lunenburgh, or the Old Eastern District, page 319 & 320, Chapter XXXVI - John Baker, the last of those who were born in slavery in Canada.)
  • Will*: 27 August 1804; York, York Co., Upper Canada; "Mr. Gray made his will on the 27th of August. 1804, the third paragraph of which is as follows: "I feel it a duty incumbent on me, in consequence of the long and faithful services of Dorine, mv black woman servant, rendered to my family, to release, manumit and discharge her from the state of slavery in which she now is, and to give her and all her children their freedom. My will therefore is, that she be released, and I hereby accordingly release, manumit and discharge the said Dorine, and all and every of her said children, both male and female, from slavery, and declare them and every of them to be free." The fourth clause is in these words: "And in order that provisions may be made for the said Dorine and her children, and that she may not want after my decease, my will is, and I hereby empower my executors, out of my real estate to raise the sum of twelve hundred pounds currency, and place the same in some solvent and secure fund, and the interest arising from the same I give and bequeath to the said Dorine, her heirs and assigns for ever, to be paid annually."" Lunenburgh or the Old Eastern District, Chapter XXXVI - JOHN BAKER, THE LAST OF THOSE WHO HAD BEEN BORN IN SLAVERY IX CANADA, Page 323 & 324
  • Note: 8 October 1804; Upper Canada; "At his death Gray owned 12,000 acres of land and had debts of £1,200. By his will he freed the old family slave Dorinda (Dorine) Baker and left a trust of £1,200 to provide for her welfare. Earlier in the year on a trip to Albany, N.Y., he had purchased her mother Lavine for $50 and “promised her that she may work as much or as little as she pleases, while she lives.” He gave £50 and 200 acres each to Dorinda’s sons, John and Simon Baker. The remainder of his estate he divided among his relatives and friends including £20 to former Chief Justice John ELMSLEY “in token of my regard and esteem.” http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio/gray_robert_isaac_dey_5E.html2

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.
  2. [S129] Dictionary Cdn BIOs, online unknown url.